Watts River Brewing

We love a good bromance at One Hour Out, and nothing spells bromance better than two mates making beer in a shed. Aaron and Ben (ex-White Rabbit) and their families have built a brand new brewery in Healesville’s industrial estate, a literal stones-throw from Four Pillars Gin. The place has a funky industrial chic thing going on, with green velour couches, mismatched decor (in a good way) and a kind of a share-house lounge room vibe. The shiny new brewery is a dominant feature of the backdrop, and the sound system pumps out the kind of music I’d want at my parties – it’s a Beiber-free zone.

The beers by Aaron and Ben are worth travelling for. If you love Bridge Road Brewers, you’ll love these too. It’s a smaller range and a smaller scale, but we loved that about them too. My personal fave is the IPA – I’m a sucker for hoppy beers that are light on the malt. For the non-beer drinkers, theres a select range of stellar local wines by the glass. My drinking buddy had a chardonnay from Tarrawarra Estate.

Keep an eye on the social media pages for these guys – they pop up at all sorts of events, and are not averse to hosting a big southern beer and bbq event at the shed.

Barangaroo Wines

The wine industry in Horsham is small. Barangaroo is one of two wineries in the area. They grow everything they make on the property: principally cabernet, merlot, shiraz and vermentino. The rustic barn is set next to an expanse of manicured lawn, which is a comfortable space for a picnic on warmer days.

Speaking of picnics, the large platter on offer at Barangaroo is possibly the single largest collection of small goods, cheeses, relishes and preserves ever laid on a single plank. Enough for a group of peckish road-trippers until dinner at one of the excellent new places in town.

Wines Geelong

Words by Mike Emmett
Photography by Mike Emmett and Bec Smith

Here’s what I knew about the area around Geelong: it’s the home of the Cats, Ford used to build cars there, and up the road is the Bells Beach Surfing Classic. I have travelled there a bit more recently, specifically to the Surf Coast, because I love Jan Juc and Torquay. But I honestly had not much knowledge of the region as far as wines go. A day making short hops across the three areas (yes, there are three sub-regions) was an eye-opener.

We started our day at Basil’s Farm in Portarlington, in the Bellarine region. There’s a view here across to Queenscliff that I’d always imagined might exist, but never really sought out. From our table looking across the potager kitchen garden to the water, we enjoyed a late breakfast from the seasonal menu. Most of the produce here comes from the farm’s own gardens or nearby. The wines are typically maritime, which seems obvious from the proximity of the vines to the sea, but it’s a difference in flavour which is particularly noticeable in delicate varieties like pinot noir. The estate is a stunning property – animals, the garden and the cafe restaurant all make your time sitting and wandering a truly delicious one.

It’s only a skip from Basil’s Farm to the wonders of cidery goodness at Flying Brick Cider Co. I had no prior knowledge of this place and, hence, no idea what to expect. I think I was waiting to pull up a narrow driveway to a dinky shed where a couple of mates squished apples. Ah, no. This place is proper. If you’re a fan of Innocent Bystander or Little Creatures, you will love Flying Brick. It’s got a similar, large semi-industrial aesthetic, with loads of bustling staff. The cranking kitchen turns out what I think is fair to call ‘big friendly lunch’ food. Pork belly and its perfect cider match – that kind of thing. If you come for a weekend, pop out here for a night with some mates. The ciders are great, the food is great, and it’s just great fun.

We were lucky enough on our one-day adventure to coincide with an opening of the cellar door at Austins & Co. It’s a large winery producing excellent wines from its Moorabool Valley home. We have discovered other gems out here, like Clyde Park and Wines by Farr, certainly waving the banner for quality. Austins & Co. are no different in that respect. What they do do differently is hospitality. If you have an event to host and want something different, this place is amazing. If you want a one-off, dare I say ‘quirky’, food and wine experience, then get on the mailing list and come to one of their special days.

The folks at Austins & Co. put us on to our lunch spot. They suggested we try one of the new wunderkinds, St Regis at Waurn Ponds. I’d only known of Waurn Ponds because it’s where I turn off to go to the Surf Coast. These guys are the kind of talented people who made me wonder what the hell I did with my twenties. Owning a winery and running a restaurant certainly weren’t amongst my pastimes. Oh well, it’s to our benefit that it’s the passion of Katherine and Jake and their chef Kate. The kitchen is turning out some stunning produce-driven food from a simple menu. Please, set this spot as a must-do for a weekend lunch.

Our day ended up on the Surf Coast, with a lazy afternoon at Bellbrae Estate. On weekends this place pumps with live music, lawn picnics and wine tasting. Throw the blanket on the lawn, take a bottle of their Longboard Pinot Noir and a platter of cheeses, and kick back. It’s the perfect sunny afternoon thing to do. November to February there are live bands most weekends. James took us through a complete and knowledgeable tasting, and we learnt a lot about what makes the Geelong wine region so special. Tastes good too: we’ll be back to continue our education in this region out west.

Bright Chocolate

Honestly, if your best chocolate experience involved a mass-produced bar of something brown, you need to listen up.

Chocolate is like wine. Chocolate is like coffee. Chocolate is as seasonal as your tomatoes and apples. Speaking of apples, different places grow different tasting cacao. And this all adds up to single-origin chocolates which show all these variations in flavour. It’s exciting the first time you see it and taste it for yourself. There’s no better place than Bright Chocolate to have this experience. Here, the chocolate is made in front of you – from the cacao beans through to the packaged product. One of the few makers in Australia to commit to the whole process from bean to bar, Bright Chocolate gives you an experience every chocolate lover needs.

Mansfield Coffee Merchant

Something that our research for One Hour Out has taught us is that it’s wrong to stereotype passion for quality food (coffee, in particular) as a ‘city thing’. Mansfield Coffee Merchant, 180kms from Melbourne, does great coffee. You get that impression from the moment you walk in and see the Roastmax roaster right up the front of the store. While it’s still operational, we are told this one is now mostly decorative. Indeed, off the strength of wholesale orders all over the northeast of Victoria (and some into Melbourne), they have largely moved the roasting operation to another facility.

Another of our benchmarks is chai. We are as fussy about it as we are about coffee. No powders, no syrups. And that’s what made us fall for the Mansfield Chai (we had almond milk). It was a wet spice mix, made properly. The chai tea was pretty mean too – just one of a good range of teas on offer.

Though we were somewhat preoccupied with the coffee and tea, the food here is good too. Simple menu, well executed.

Clyde Park

Clyde Park is one of those jaw-dropping moments in wine touring. You step out of the car behind the winery, walk around to the restaurant and cellar door, and find yourself looking over a balcony across the valley. It’s a stunning view across the vines. Pinot lovers will have a field day here. It’s a study in terroir – the impact of local conditions, soils, etc on specific sites. Here they craft single-block wines of such different refined character that it’s hard to believe they come from the same property.

The real bonus here is that the food is amazing. Great wood-fired pizzas cooked in front of you (weekends), and a seasonal al la carté menu with what owner Sue humbly calls “home-style” food. It’s the kind of home I’d like to live in, if this is what’s cooked there. It’s so easy to spend half a day here, tasting extraordinary wine, eating Sue’s food and staring out at that view. Wow, that view.

Oh, if you’re planning a special event, while you’re standing at the tasting bar, turn 180 degrees and stare at  the awesomeness that is the barrel-hall event space. Long table dinner or lunch in a working winery. Perfect.

Austin’s & Co.

This is one of those ‘you’d better sign up to the mailing list’ moments, because you’ll want to book early. The monthly lunches are a long-table affair, showcasing the local produce and, of course, Scott’s wine. We had the mainstay Chardonnay and Pinot. It’s an education in the influence of maritime conditions on the growing of grapes. These wines have a delicious complexity afforded them by the climate. 

Pierrepoint Wines

Andrew and Jenny are the kind of family hosts you expect from a little cellar door on a private property. They love what they do, though like most growers and makers, they question their own sanity. We didn’t have any further questions after sampling the wines, though. They’re all a perfect education in terroir – that fancy French word for the intangible combination of place, climate, season, and ‘vibe’ that makes wines taste the way they do. Regular music gigs held at the venue make it worth signing up to the newsletter.

These little places are why we leave the city for a long weekend.

Sage Beef

If you love your food and you eat meat, you should know where it comes from. It’s a tenet preached by celebrity chefs and foodies alike. We wish all our beef and lamb came from Sage Farm. The animals live such a charmed life, and the quality of the product shows it. We started a day in the Moorabool Valley with a visit to Sage Farm, and spent some time with Chris and his family taking a tour of the property and meeting his happy livestock. It’s something you can do on a Saturday tour, too. The on-farm store stocks meat products from the farm as well as other local produce. The farm has a butchery on site, and has regular workshops. It also has accommodation in the house on site, with a view of the Moorabool Valley that has to be seen to be believed.

Having started our day at Sage, we finished at Gladioli, where Chris’s beef had come full circle and ended up on our plate in a spectacular dish. It’s the perfect way to understand the provenance of our food.

The Last Straw

In the city we’re used to post-industrial spaces popping up in what was once a drab jungle of production and necessary services. We are used to passionate people filling these spaces with their own blend of ideas, not driven by high-street expectations. We are used to these spaces being goddamn awesome. So the Last Straw is one of those goddamn awesome little post-industrial businesses, cutting their own path with fresh, real Thai flavours from a small daily menu. Think ‘street food goes bricks and mortar’.  Or in this case straw. Fresh food. Tick. Flavour. Tick.

Coffee? The Has-Garanti roaster in the corner should set your fears aside. They roast their own, and pull shots on a Faema E61, complete with naked portafilter. It’s bloody good.