Guilt-free fashion that turns trash into treasure

Words by Della Vreeland
Images Supplied

They say in the midst of chaos, there is always opportunity. And this was most certainly the case for Jessica Yorston. Her jewellery-making story started last year as she was dealing with the chaos of managing an ailing tribe.

“I was home with sick children, looking at all the single-use plastics, and I thought ‘what can I make with this? Let’s make something useful, and potentially nice to look at.”

After some quick scouring online, Jessica came across videos of people melting plastics using sandwich presses. And so started the Single Use Multiverse (SUM) journey.

Having studied Fashion Design at RMIT and with years of practical experience, including the creation of her own ethical fashion label, Jessica already had an eye for good design and a passion for sustainable practices. It was just a matter of harnessing these into another medium.

Disheartened by the copious amount of waste produced by the fashion industry, Jessica decided to use her creative prowess to make a difference.

I’d arrived at the realisation that I couldn’t bear to make anything from new materials and to be honest, I was completely over the fashion industry – so wasteful and vacuous.

“I was about to begin studying something completely not-fashion, when the maker in me began playing around with creating colourful sheets by melting waste plastic.”

“It’s been deeply exciting to continue creating products by turning trash into treasure for our ears. The awful feeling that my creating was contributing new matter to the huge expanse of it wrecking the earth, was gone.”

“It’s so satisfying.”

Jessica’s statement earrings are bright, bold and edgy – certain to make an impression.

Her items are made from 100 % recycled single-use plastics such as milk cartons, straws, plastic lids, shampoo bottles, pot plants, formula lids and more. Using a portable oven, Jessica melts the plastics into colourful sheets before cutting the eclectic shapes that form her earrings.

A Blackwood resident, she says her lush and serene home provides the perfect backdrop for the forging of eco-friendly products.

According to Jessica, she’s become the “crazy plastic-collecting lady”, with her fellow Blackwood comrades encouraging her and supporting her along every step of this creative journey.

“We were living in Melbourne, but finding ourselves chasing trees on nearly every day off. So we thought, let’s just live where we want to be on our days off,” she says.

“Besides the very beautiful forest setting, and the dreaminess of being able to wake up to it every morning, the creative community here is epic! Lots of talented and friendly characters experimenting in their fields – it’s inspiring.”

“I also love the amazing encouragement I receive, in the form of words and plastic donations. All the local townsfolk leave bags of their single-use plastics at the top of my driveway, or in their letterboxes for me to collect. It’s brilliant! I’ve also got some amazing neighbours who help me process the plastics for melting by washing and chopping it. Carbon emissions are low!”

While Jessica’s business is primarily based online, with the exception of a few stockists around the state and the odd market appearance, she says the onset of COVID didn’t have too drastic an impact on her – even though she started just as the pandemic hit.

“Perhaps I was at an advantage as people were online more,” she says.

“It was really nice being able to connect with people, through social media platforms, regarding what I was making. Lots of lovely Instagram chats with people excited about my materials and process, which helped ease the bizarreness of that first lockdown.”

What did have an impact on Jessica’s creative process, however, was the fierce storms that hit the community of Blackwood and its surroundings earlier this month.

Jessica says the whole landscape changed as a result, and her business faced a temporary halt.

“I couldn’t melt plastic with no power!” she says.

“I’ve been so blessed to have so many earring orders, both wholesale and online, that I had absolutely no backup stock before the storms.”

“Every pair has been made to order the last few months, so no power meant my lovely customers had to wait longer for their orders.”

“But I’ve been so blown away by everyone’s understanding and patience.”


THE DETAILS

WHAT: Single Use Multiverse
FIND OUT MORE:  OHO Markets

2021 Archibald Prize to takeover Gippsland Art Gallery

We wish to acknowledge the Gunaikurnai people as traditional owners of this land and to pay our respects to their Elders, past and present.

Join in the centenary celebrations of Australia’s favourite art award with a visit to Gippsland this October/November. Gippsland Art Gallery is rightfully excited and proud to be chosen as the sole Victorian venue to host the 2021 Archibald Prize on its regional tour.

The Art Gallery of NSW whittled down some 938 entries to just 52 for this year’s prize. Visitors can play spot the familiar face amongst subjects ranging from politicians to celebrities, sporting heroes and artists.

For his winning portrait, Peter Wegner chose fellow artist Guy Warren (also celebrating his 100th birthday) as his subject. Incidentally, Warren won the prestigious award himself in 1985.

Painting styles vary as widely as the subjects and no doubt much discussion will be had over the various merits of them all. One highly commended piece from Sydney artist Jude Rae – Inside Out – deals with themes many will be able to relate to from the past year.

As Rae herself states, ‘It seemed to me that the self-portrait is the most compelling expression of this inwardness, but also a reminder that, while we might feel singular, we are not separate. We think of ourselves alone at our peril.’

Overlooking waterways and parklands in the Port of Sale precinct, the gallery expects to welcome over 50,000 visitors during the exhibition’s 45 days and with free entry there’s no excuse not to bring the kids along for a bit of culture.


THE DETAILS

WHAT: Archibald Prize – Gippsland Art Gallery
WHERE: 70 Foster St, Sale
WHEN: Friday 8th October – Sunday 21st November 2021 – open 7 days
MORE INFO:  2021 Archibald Prize


Image Credits:

Archibald Prize 2021 finalist
Peter Wegner
Portrait of Guy Warren at 100
oil on canvas, 120.5 x 151.5 cm
© the artist
Photo: AGNSW, Jenni Carter
Sitter: Guy Warren
Archibald Prize 2021 finalist
Natasha Bieniek
Rachel Griffiths
oil on wood, 13.5 x 18.5 cm
© the artist
Photo: AGNSW, Mim Stirling
Sitter: Rachel Griffiths
Archibald Prize 2021 finalist
Kirthana Selvaraj
The green suit, a self-portrait
oil on canvas, 150.2 x 90.1 cm
© the artist
Photo: AGNSW, Mim Stirling
Sitter: Kirthana Selvaraj

How Bendigo plans to ignite your senses this wintertime

Words by Della Vreeland
Images Supplied

Australia’s first (and only) UNESCO Creative City and Region of Gastronomy is taking things up a notch this wintertime with its magical Ignite Festival.

With a sprinkle of razzle and a whole bunch of dazzle, the city will be transformed into a centre of vibrant activity where spirit and imagination abound!

Featuring a plethora of food and drink events, masterclasses and retreats, art and cultural soirees, markets and music festivals, there is an experience set to indulge all.

Here are some of the ways Ignite is set to sparkle your senses this winter season.

See the magic unfold

Ignite BendigoThere is an abundance of performance and culturally instilled events taking place during Ignite, making up the core of the festival program.

The Awaken event will illuminate Rosalind Park, and the Mary Quant Fashion Revolutionary exhibition will continue at the Bendigo Art Gallery (with an accompanying 60s Quant Up Late event).

Taste and smell the fine fare

As a UNESCO City of Gastronomy, you know you’re in for a real (culinary) treat no matter when you visit Bendigo. But come time for the Ignite Festival, and the city’s cafes, restaurants and bars put their best foot forward with a whole series of specially-curated events showcasing the best in local food and drink.

Enjoy a high tea in style, sit down for a Bastille Day feast, experience a Spanish Christmas in July, devour regional fare at the launch of Bendigo’s newest foodie neighbourhood Lyttle Eat Street, get your meat fix at the Slow Smokin’ Saturdays, share a night of wonder and wine under the stars with the Astronomical Society of Victoria, and savour a whole lot of other dinners, lunches and brunches in regional Victoria’s leading food destination.

Proud Dja Dja Wurrung, Latje Latje and Wotjabulluk woman Raylene Harradine will also be hosting a 6Seasons Dinner along with chef Gina Triolo from Bendigo’s Hoo-gah Cafe. The special degustation-styled event will feature six courses, each focussed on the six Aboriginal annual seasons of Birak, Bunuru, Djeran, Makuru, Djilba and Kambarang.

Hear the tunes and tales

Ignite BendigoAnother sure way to warm up during the chilly months is with some sweet melodies and stories – blues on the Victorian Goldfields Railway train or live at Castlemaine’s Taproom, a two-day festival of Americana bands at Shiraz Republic or a session of storytelling about People and Country at the Ulumbarra Theatre.

Feel the warmth as your hands make and create

The festival program has all the hands-on folk covered too, with workshops and masterclasses that will ignite a passion for cooking, creating, cheesemaking and croissant-ing (don’t mind our love for alliteration).

Take up cheesemaking sessions with resident French makers at Long Paddock Cheese, learn the art of croissant making from a Michelin-trained pastry chef, enrol in a cooking class or two, enjoy a one-day mosaic workshop, or try your hand at writing at the Hidden Writer retreats.

Once you’re done making, you can also head to one of the different markets and find some handmade goodness for yourself – nicely rounding off your Ignite experience.

Now there’s a delight for the senses.


THE DETAILS:

WHAT: Ignite Bendigo
WHEN: 1st June – 31st August
FIND OUT MORE: bendigoregion.com.au/explore-bendigo/ignite-bendigo

Art that unites, inspires and enhances understanding

Word by Della Vreeland
Images Supplied

Achieving understanding and respect between indigenous and non-indigenous peoples. Uniting and inspiring.

This is what Cassie Leatham sets out to do through her work.

“My art has many stories,” the proud Taungurung woman says.

“I try to inspire the youth and try to unite the community and bring non-indigenous people on the journey as well as breaking down barriers and bringing cultural education.”

“My art for me is not art. It’s my life journey and my ancestors’ ways.”

Growing up, Cassie was always connected to nature and its natural resources. The desire to create was instilled within her.

“When I was 15 I knew I wanted to be an artist but had other interests as well,” she recalls.

“I entered my first art competition and won and then I donated the prize money to a charity and decided I would continue creating and exhibiting my works.”

Over the last three decades, Cassie’s work has been acquired by the National Gallery of Victoria, Koorie Heritage Trust Collection, Melbourne Magistrates Court of Victoria and is exhibited nationally and internationally.

Working across a range of mediums, she likens her process to the methods of her ancestors before her.

“We create with all varieties of materials so that’s why I am who I am today. I don’t like to focus on one as why should I?” she exclaims.

It’s all about connection to the past and keeping traditional techniques alive for my people and the future generations.

As well as being an artist and master weaver, much of Cassie’s work is based around cultural education, healing, storytelling, dance and song.

She regularly hosts workshops in bush tukka, traditional weaving, bush craft, murals, ochre painting, bark paintings and a whole lot more.

Over the next year, Cassie says she hopes to continue educating, creating and sharing her wonders with whoever wants to learn.

“I don’t ever set goals for myself, as I feel spirit will guide me to do what I am meant to do,” she says.

“My journey is mine alone. I share my personal journey and my ways of collecting and making in my educational workshops and education. To pass on skills to future generations is important to me. It’s what I focus on the most.

“Healing for me is to pick up rubbish along sides of the roads and to clear sites of unwanted disposed items and care for my country and environment. It’s also ceremony and song and dance as well in my own personal space. Storytelling is empowering to share the stories of the old people.”

This year’s National Reconciliation Week (NRW) theme is ‘More Than a Word: Reconciliation Takes Action’.

The theme urges the reconciliation movement towards braver and more impactful action, remembering the importance of privileging and amplifying First Nations’ voices.

For Cassie, NRW will include the facilitation of education workshops in order for young people to further understand her community’s cultural practices.

“There is recognised aboriginal art and more and more opportunities are arising for aboriginal artists to share and create and exhibit works,” she says.

She hopes Australians everywhere will take this week to reflect, celebrate each other’s cultures, and be proud of who they are.

“I have seen so much unfold in my time from when I’ve been an emerging artist to now being an established artist and hoping aboriginal art keeps going strong.”

For 35 years, Cassie has developed her career and been presented with multiple career opportunities.

But her art has always been integral to who she is.

“I think, honestly, I was born to carry and continue my ancestors’ work on my journey,” she says.

“I feel that support is needed in becoming more aware of the talent of aboriginal artists and the diversity of artists that are not only from up north but here in Victoria.

“It would be giving our people here more encouragement and strength to share their art.”

To find out more about Cassie’s work, visit wildblakarts.com.au


THE DETAILS:

WHAT: National Reconciliation Week
WHEN: May 27 to June 3
FIND OUT MORE: reconciliation.org.au/national-reconciliation-week

Street art and eco-luxury come together in this pop-up hotel

Images Supplied

You must’ve been living under a rock not to have heard about the Silo Art Trail. Stretching over 200km in Victoria’s north-west Wimmera Mallee region, it’s been called Australia’s largest outdoor gallery for good reason. Whatever direction you’re visiting from, you’re going to need somewhere to stay. For one month only, your best bet is the Silo Art Pop-Up Hotel on the edge of pink-hued Lake Tyrrell.

The hotel is the brainchild of Contained – a group that have re-purposed shipping containers as restaurants, bars, offices and much more. Each eco-pod may have a low carbon footprint but doesn’t skimp on the finishing touches: Australian-made toiletries, minibar stocked with locally-sourced treats, luxuriously soft bed linens, continental breakfast and a private deck for you to drink in the peace under more stars than you’ve seen in a long time.

Each pod will also feature bespoke art thanks to street art agency, Juddy Roller.

First pod features work by Matt Adnate, a well-respected creator of multicultural portraiture whose work can be seen at the Sheep Hills silo (completed in 2016). His paintings exhibit a bold energy, dramatic use of light and shade and a sensitive approach to Indigenous culture and stories.

Drapl will team up with The Zookeeper to adorn a second hotel pod. Their 2019 work at the Sea Lake silos celebrates the local Boorong people’s strong connection to nearby Lake Tyrrell. It is a haunting image, especially at night as the massive artwork bleeds into the night sky.

Former lawyer and now street artist Kaff-eine will adorn the swimming pool container with a colourful mural. Her photorealistic portraiture is imbued with symbolism and narrative, securing her a loyal following locally and abroad.

Visit Victoria has compiled a field guide with plenty of resources to help you plan your trip.


THE DETAILS

WHAT: Silo Art Trail Pop-up Hotel
WHERE: Lake Tyrrell, near Sea Lake
WHEN: Friday 11th June – Monday 12th July 2021
MORE INFO: booking details here

A new 3 week festival is coming to East Gippsland this winter

Images Supplied

One takeaway from 2020 we’re glad to embrace is the backyard getaway. Amidst the uncertainty of international (and at times interstate) travel, there’s never been a better time to explore your own state. From charming small towns, a vibrant arts scene, local produce the envy of many, spectacular coastlines, excellent eateries and much more, there’s one place that has this all wrapped up – East Gippsland.

East Gippsland Winter Festival (June 18 to July 11) is a celebration of all things art, music, wine, craft beer and local produce. Spread over three weeks there will be a raft of activities including interactive art installations, pop-up events, live music, workshops, exclusive dinners and lavish feasts showcasing the best the region has to offer.

With bushfires, drought and Covid challenging many a local business, festival founder Adam Bloem was looking for a way to attract more people to the region. ’I wanted something that encouraged people to stay a bit longer and travel around and explore all of the little towns and villages.’

We now have over 70 events on our festival program and the majority of these have been devised and organised by local businesses, community groups and passionate locals. The response has been overwhelming and we can’t wait to welcome thousands of visitors to East Gippsland over winter where there will be lots of things to see, do, eat and drink right across the region.

From Mallacoota to Paynesville, north to Omeo and everywhere in between, friendly locals can’t wait to share their special corner of the world with you. Kick it off on Friday, June 18 with the official festival opening in Bairnsdale with live music and roving performers, as well as a bevy of food/wine options and art projections throughout the town.

Pencil in the Pinot Picnic and Masterclass on Sunday, June 20 thanks to the acclaimed Sardine Eatery + Bar and Lightfoot & Sons Winery. This not-to-be-missed event salutes Gippsland Lakes District’s exceptional pinot noir at Lightfoot and Son’s cellar door. The winemaker-guided Masterclass will take place in their barrel room with guests enjoying a Sardine Eatery picnic box filled with cheese, charcuterie and conserves.

This year’s winter solstice on Monday, June 21 just happens to coincide with World Bathing Day. Join bathers from across the globe at sunrise for a live-streamed Global Sound Bath. From the new pop-up bathing area on the future Metung Hot Springs site, drink in the beauty of the natural surrounds for a calm and balanced start to your day.

#worldbathingday

The Lakes Light Festival on Saturday, June 26 promises to be a festival highlight. Watch a mural painting as it unfolds in both a virtual sense and in reality at the former iceworks factory, and now arts hub, in Lakes Entrance.

Is it time to unleash your inner artist? Then don’t miss the lantern making workshop on Tuesday, June 29 in Swifts Creek. This idyllic town in the Tambo Valley is quickly developing a strong reputation for its arts scene and part in the Great Alpine Arts Trail. Experienced local artists will guide you through the process and shine a light on your creative side. Great fun for all ages!

One of the festival standouts has to be the Sailors Grave Deep Winter Festival on Saturday, July 3. Sailors Grave is a darling of the craft beer scene for good reason. Their complex beers (and idiosyncratic branding) tell the story of their unique region, their terroir. None more so than their recent release Dark Emu Dark Lager, a collaboration with Uncle Bruce Pascoe honouring indigenous culture and knowledge.

The Deep Winter event kicks off at 6 pm at the home of Sailors Grave brewery, a 100-year-old butter factory on the banks of the Snowy River. Music will be provided by post-punk Oz rock band Shepparton Airplane and other special guests, with food by Melbourne butchers Meatsmith. Co-founders Gab and Chris Moore can’t wait to welcome you.

By now you’re thinking it might be a great idea to plan a little exercise and thankfully the area has some of the most scenic trails in the state. Little River Gorge Walk will certainly get the blood pumping but also rewards that effort with a stunning view over one of Victoria’s deepest gorges and the mis-named Little River. Of course, a leisurely stroll around one of the area’s many lakes might be more your pace. Check out some of the options here.

So many activities – both day and night – means you’re going to need somewhere to stay. With accommodation options from traditional B&Bs, luxe glamping or maybe a waterside retreat complete with mooring for your boat, there’s no excuse not to head east this winter.

THE DETAILS

WHAT: East Gippsland Winter Festival
WHERE: Various locations around East Gippsland
WHEN: Saturday 19th June – Sunday 11th July 2021
MORE INFO:  Register for program updates at the East Gippsland Winter Festival website.

The Geelong Arts Centre launches its wistful Winter Escape Season

Images Supplied

After a year of cancelled events and a winter spent indoors, now is the time to jump back into the world. The Geelong Arts Centre has launched its 2021 Winter Escape Season to help you do it.

Geelong’s home of all things performing arts, the Geelong Arts Centre is no stranger to a killer season of events, stage shows and spectacles. Their upcoming Winter Escape Season is setting a cracking pace as their coolest yet with performances from some of Australia’s most exciting creatives.

Held across three spaces – Ryrie Street Building, the redeveloped Costa Hall and The Pier – the season consists of dizzying cabarets, operas, theatre and comedy, as well shows from our First Nations performers, all in a COVID-safe way.

“We are thrilled to return to the home of Where Creativity Meets, in both Costa Hall and Ryrie Street, to provide the G21 community with a Winter Escape in the comfort of their very own backyard; connecting them to world-class performances and multi-arts experiences,” Geelong Arts Centre Chief Executive Officer and Creative Director, Joel McGuinness said.

From big name acts like Isaiah Firebrace performing his huge pop hits, to quirky comedy lectures about Love Song Dedications by the group Ten Tonne Sparrow, there’s a night of entertainment for everyone at the festival. Other events include the gripping play Prima Facie by the Griffin Theatre Company and Carmen the opera from Opera Australia. A full list of shows can be found on the Geelong Arts Centre website.

Tickets are on sale now for individuals, groups and multi-passes. Audience capacities are strictly limited, so be sure to get in quick. After all, what better way is there to get warmed up over winter other than some electrifying performances?

THE DETAILS
WHAT: Geelong Arts Centre 2021 Winter Escape Season
WHERE: Geelong Arts Centre | 81 Ryrie Street, Geelong
WHEN: 29 May – 30 October 2021
MORE INFO: Geelong Arts Centre

A florist’s plea for all to wake up and smell the roses

Words by Della Vreeland
Images Supplied

Katie Marx’s relationship with the natural world can be described as thus.

“A lifetime love affair.”

Growing up on a farm in regional New Zealand, the florist says she was instilled with an affinity for her surroundings from a young age.

“Mum was a landscaper, so we had this incredible garden growing up, and I don’t ever remember a time when I didn’t have a patch of garden where I was allowed to plant my own stuff,” Katie recalls.

But it wasn’t just her farmhouse lifestyle that conjured Katie’s love for the earth. For the mother-of-two, being immersed in nature is seen as a form of meditation.

For me, going for a bushwalk or camping and having that stillness seems like a real meditation.

“Our family goes camping as much as we can, and it’s being in nature with no other people around, and the stillness and life that is going on around you, that I adore so much.

“I love walking through the Australian bush and driving past places that may not seem like anything at first glance. But when you take notice and you see that detail and beauty in everything – it brings me so much joy.”

Katie decided to officially harness her passion for flowers and foliage into a business venture over a decade ago, launching her very own floristry business out of her humble kitchen bench in Northcote.

Fast forward 14 years, and she is currently based in Newstead with her partner, Greg, and their two girls.

Her family are the proud owners of the multi-purpose hub that is Butterland – a former butter factory lovingly restored into a space where heritage, nature and creation combine.

Katie says it took close to six months to return the factory back to its former glory, with the building also used as a candle factory up until 2009.

Since taking over ownership, Katie and Greg have transformed the heritage-listed property, celebrating its history while giving it a whole new lease on life.

The space plays host to many number of events, weddings, workshops and soirees, each characterised by Katie’s incredible floristry and underlined by her strong work ethos which is based on a love for native fauna and the use of seasonal and sustainable materials.

“I’ve always had a strong connection to nature and I hope my work makes other people aware of their connection too.

“I want people to look closely around them and realise that they don’t have to buy stuff all the time. There are so many beautiful things we can use in our everyday lives.”

A huge advocate for supporting local growers and industry, Katie is also part of a sustainable floristry project which is devoted to promoting mindful floristry.

“I try not to preach or be a martyr. It’s just about trying to make the florists coming through a bit more mindful in their work,” she says.

“Just because your grandmother was a florist and did it one way, doesn’t mean you have to.”

Katie’s passion is real. Her love affair with flowers and foliage is clear. Her desire to maintain natural beauty for generations to come is more than apparent.

“I love regional Victoria and can’t imagine ever moving back to the city. I’ll always be a country girl now.”

To find out more about Katie’s work, as well as her workshops and events, hit up the Butterland website.


THE DETAILS:

WHAT: Butterland
WHEN: Now
FIND OUT MORE: Butterland

Say hello to ‘Cultural Exchange’, Bendigo’s newest art and culture hub

When you think of artistic and cultural hubs, Bendigo may not initially spring to mind. But that’s all changing thanks to a new dedicated space for artists to develop, create and share their work – right in the centre of town.

Meet ‘Cultural Exchange’, Bendigo’s latest artistic zone for Indigenous and multicultural artists. Housed in the recently renovated and restored Beehive Building, the space is the first of its kind in the region. The modus operandi? An inclusive, vibrant home for culturally diverse artists to share both art and culture with the wider community.

Inside the historic building there are art studios, performance and rehearsal space, art workshops and classes – all open now and accessible to the public. And if you’re in the mood for a window shop (or a real shop), there is a gallery space and a gift store where you can purchase handmade treasures by local artists.

Unlike many gallery spaces, the Cultural Exchange will showcase a dynamic display of the latest works by the resident artists, with new pieces going on the walls as soon as they’re completed. That’s great news for locals and day trippers alike who’ll get the chance to spy new work every time they stop by.

The launch a momentous occasion for the community of Bendigo who have been longing for a cultural centre point for years now. And the crew at Multicultural Arts Victoria Bendigo are the ones to thank. Alongside the 20-30 artists who now practice at the space, they’ve made one of regional Vic’s freshest arts and culture hubs possible. We think that’s a little bit great.

THE DETAILS
WHAT: Cultural Exchange
WHERE: Beehive Building, 18-26 Pall Mall, Bendigo
WHEN: Open Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays
MORE INFO: Multicultural Arts Victoria

OHO in ISO: Debra Mcfadzean from Shape & Line

Images supplied

Debra Mcfadzean has been a professional photographer for 20 years. She shoots Interior, Lifestyle, Food, Portraiture and Travel. Debra’s philosophy towards her work is ‘I’m always, always looking’ for grace and symmetry and kind of wabi-sabi elegance and she finds these elements come together in unusual hidden places sometimes.

How has your photography business been affected by COVID-19?

My art print sales went up which I was a bit surprised about. I guess with people stuck at home they decided it was a good time to redecorate.

However, the commercial work took a pretty big hit, with most jobs in the pipeline cancelled in a matter of days of each other which was worrying at the time. The jobs are still there to be done when restrictions permit so it should work out ok.

Who have you been in lockdown with?

My daughter Harriet, partner Geo and our two dogs Alby and Tikki, the dogs have been the real winners in recent times, with lots of walks and attention for them.

What do you think have been the positives of this crisis?

I have used the extra time, like many, to forge ahead with new business development and work on plans and ideas that had been lurking in my mind but I hadn’t had the time to implement.   

On a social level, it’s been great watching my local community support local businesses and seeing families out riding their bikes and spending lots of quality time together.

Also, I’ve had more time to cook overly elaborate dinners and drink wine. A lot of wine.

What have you been watching or reading?

I got the Masterclass series and have been watching a lot of those. I’m reading Leigh Sales Any Ordinary Day now and next up is Jedidiah Jenkins To Shake the Sleeping Self.

What adventures are you planning as restrictions ease?

I am hoping to get to Perisher for the snow season this year with my family and will be making a trip to Sydney to shoot some landscapes for my fine art collections as soon as I can.

I think I’ll also pop up north for some sunny days too.


The Details:

Have a browse of Debra Mcfadzean’s original photographic artworks that have been taken at beautiful locations across Victoria over on OHO Markets. We can’t promise that you won’t be tempted to purchase one.